Admission, Curriclum, and Diploma

Educational Policy

Future University Hakodate decides on following three educational policy for seeking to create a a society that “human” and “science” are harmonized, develop intelligent human resources corresponding to the advanced information society and creative human resources with richness in mind, cooperate with regional society as an intellectual, cultural, and international exchange base,and contribute to academic, cultural, and industrial promotion.

Three Policies for Undergraduate Education

 

 

Admission Policy

With the motto Open Space, Open Mind, Future University Hakodate (FUN) aims to foster students in five main areas: (1) Systems Information Science; (2) problem finding and solving; (3) communication and teamwork; (4) autonomous learning; (5) the Humanities.

Based on the aims above, FUN offers a core curriculum, communication courses, and course-specific subjects so that the students can obtain a strong academic foundation in their major. Furthermore, emphasis is placed on problem-solving skills, communication skills, and autonomous learning attitudes through training, discussion, field work and project learning. As a culmination of their undergraduate education, students write a graduation thesis and present their research.

Therefore, FUN expects students to have:

  • the necessary academic skills, techniques, and logical thinking skills for successfully completing the educational curriculum listed above;
  • a strong interest and curiosity in Systems Information Science;
  • motivation to contribute to future society by cultivating computational thinking, and effectively collecting and interpreting information.
    (Purpose of Student Selection)

FUN aims to accept students with a strong motivation for learning, and adopts various selection methods for applicants.

General Entrance Examination (1st Phase) 

To demonstrate logical thinking skills, and the comprehensive academic skills and knowledge in science, math and English needed to be a specialist in Systems Information Science.

General Entrance Examination (2nd Phase)

To demonstrate high scholastic abilities in science, math and English needed to be a specialist in Systems Information Science.

AO Examination

  • To demonstrate a strong interest and curiosity in Systems Information Science, to demonstrate the necessary basic academic skills in science, math and English, to exercise logical thinking and problem-solving, and to effectively communicate results.
  • To demonstrate advanced academic skills in math and science with an emphasis on community experience related to Systems Information Science.

Entrance Examination by Commendation

To have a strong interest and curiosity in Systems Information Science, demonstrate the required basic academic skills in science, math and English, demonstrate high motivation to learn autonomously and continuously, and demonstrate logical thinking and communication skills.

Examination for Transfer Admission

To have a strong interest and curiosity in Systems Information Science, demonstrate basic academic skills and applied skills with knowledge in science, math and English as well as knowledge and skills in a course-specific field, and demonstrate problem-solving and communication through logical thinking.

 

 

Curriculum Policy

The Future University Hakodate Curriculum Policy promotes: (1) a high professional capability in Systems Information Science; (2) the ability to explore and conceptualize problems supported by research skills and associated attitudes; (3) the ability to express information through teamwork and co-creation; (4) the ability to learn autonomously and continuously (meta-learning); (5) humanity.

In order to foster such qualities in students, FUN offers a Core Curriculum, Communication Subjects, Common Subjects in each course, and Course-specific Subjects. The Curricula is designed and implemented in accordance with the following objectives: (1) depending on the goals of each subject, the Curricula is implemented to promote students’ autonomous learning by combining lecture, practicum, training, discussion and fieldwork; (2) students’ achievement is evaluated in accordance with the goals of each subject; (3) FUN will grant appropriate credit hours to those who are approved.

1. Core Curriculum (for 1st – 4th year students)

The Core Curriculum consists of subjects promoting human development, social participation, understanding of science, technology and the environment, and health preservation. Students are encouraged to be aware that they are a member of society, and are expected to acquire expertise for autonomously conducting activities for the future. The Core Curriculum offers a wide-ranging education that becomes the basis for the understanding of things, making assumptions, and generating decisions.

2. Communication Subjects (for 1st and 2nd year students)

Communication courses at FUN aim to develop multi-modal and multi-literate communication skills within the contexts of science, engineering and design. The courses provide a collaborative, multi-disciplinary approach to communication by addressing special areas within information science and local/global issues. The Communication courses provide a synergistic pedagogical, learning and meta-learning combination for students to creatively communicate through a variety of media. Students will actively develop academic skills as well as professional attitudes within a supportive learning community.

3. Common Subjects in each course

Students acquire computational thinking, mathematical thinking, and design thinking. Reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, and writing skills both in Japanese and English are necessary to learn in a professional manner in all courses. Project Learning offered in the 3rd year teaches students how to locate a problem in society or the local or global community and then solve the problem as a team. Graduation Study offered in the 4th year allows students to be assigned an academic advisor. Under the advisor’s supervision, students work on their own research project using the appropriate methods of their specialty. Students must write a diploma thesis and give a presentation.

4. Information Systems Course (for the 2nd – 4th year students)

In the Information Systems Course, students learn basic and applied technology of networking, security, database, and software to support the realization of a safe, secure, and comfortable information society.

In the Graduation Study, students work on a specific problem from the perspective of promoting a safe, secure, and comfortable information society by: (1) the creation of valuable information systems; (2) the establishment of an efficient and reliable network systems; (3) the generation and analysis of wide and large-scale information. Based on the evaluation of the results, students refine their abilities to cultivate new methodologies and academic disciplines.

5. Advanced ICT Course (for the 2nd – 4th year students)

In the lectures of the Advanced ICT Course, students learn basic network technologies, security, database, and software to support the realization of a safe, secure, and comfortable information society. The course helps students to foster developmental techniques, management skills, and communication skills through practicum on systems development via government-industry-academia collaboration.

In the Graduation Study, students identify a specific problem within society and solve the problem by using ICT through: (1) the creation of valuable information systems; (2) the realization and operation of high-quality information systems; (3) team development and project management. Based on the evaluation of the results, students refine their abilities to cultivate new methodologies and academic disciplines.

6. Information Design Course (for the 2nd – 4th year students)

In the Information Design Course, students acquire knowledge, methods, and attitudes necessary for working on various problems through the experiences associated with the design process. Grounded in the theories of informatics and cognitive science, the process includes problem-finding, analysis, trial and error, suggestion, and evaluation.

In the Graduation Study, students work on a specific problem within the context of design, information engineering, and cognitive science skills and knowledge for: (1) service and value creation; (2) manufacturing and making things (kotozukuri) supported by infographics; (3) developing research areas that contribute to human-centered design. Based on the evaluation of the results, students refine their abilities to cultivate new methodologies and academic disciplines.

7. Complex Systems Course (for the 2nd – 4th year students)

In the Complex Systems Course, students learn the basis of information processing necessary for an analytical method, as well as the logical thinking necessary to understand complex systems, and then mathematically model the systems. Students interested in the laws of nature and society can acquire the ability of mathematical modelling, analysis, and application. Furthermore, students take subjects in three areas – information, math/physics, and complex systems – in order to deepen their understanding of various complex systems. Consequently, students will acquire knowledge of mathematical modelling as the basis of the analytical method.

In the Graduation Study, students work on a specific problem from the standpoint of complex systems concerning: (1) breakthrough in the laws of nature and society; (2) mathematical modelling; (3) worldwide implementations. Based on the evaluation of the results, students refine their abilities to cultivate new methodologies and academic disciplines.

8. Intelligent Systems Course (for the 2nd – 4th year students)

In the Intelligent Systems Course, students acquire logical thinking skills necessary for the breakthrough and mathematical modelling of intelligence, in addition to developing the information processes necessary for the implementation of intelligent systems. The course helps students to open their eyes to various problems of intelligence, including environment, cognition, language, media, and body. The course educates students to acquire the ability and perspective to implement the intelligent systems worldwide.

In the Graduation Study, students work on a specific problem by exploring problems on intelligence as well as new relationships between humans and artifacts. Through a constructive approach, students consider: (1) breakthroughs in human intelligence and human functions; (2) mathematical modelling; (3) worldwide implementations. Based on the evaluation of the results, students refine their abilities to cultivate new methodologies and academic disciplines.

 

Diploma Policy

Future University Hakodate exists to contribute to society by fostering harmony between humanity and science via innovative developments of information systems in an excellent learning community, and producing human resources equipped with flexible perspectives capable of creating a future society for local and global communities.

Based on this mission and the following five attributes, a Bachelor’s Diploma is awarded to those who obtain the required number of credits.

  1. Superior professional ability regarding Systems Information Science
    • Being able to abstract, systematize and model complicated objects; and utilize them in the real world.
    • Having interdisciplinary exploration and conception abilities to follow the constructive principle for implementation in the real world, and design a society by creating new information systems.
  2. Inquisitiveness and Imagination to support healthy research attitudes
    • Being able to positively confront various problems in the spirit of ‘Open Space, Open Mind’ exploring issues and solutions with good research attitudes and skills.
    • Being able to professionally face society’s problems, unraveling new methodologies or academic fields, thus contributing to the approaching information age.
  3. Expressiveness to support collaborative creativity and teamwork
    • Being able to respect people of different culture or status, building trust based on communication of science and technology, appropriate presentation of accurate information, dialoguing, studying and critiquing each idea to foster co-creation.
    • Being able to show leadership and cooperate in teams, using these shared experiences as a citizen and member of society.
  4. Meta-cognitive ability to foster autonomous and continuous learning
    • Possessing determination to learn as an adult with a broad perspective.
    • Being able to set goals to acquire knowledge and skills over a lifetime.
  5. Humane professionalism
    • Possessing an inquisitive mind and curiosity to explore issues scientifically.
    • Possessing a high standard of ethics, seeking the best solutions with sincerity.